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birthday

Colleen Broughton

MY PROGRESS

$814.00

RAISED

of my

$470.00

GOAL

MY DONORS

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Welcome to my birthday fundraising page!

It’s my 47th birthday, and one gift option I’m asking for is to help fund cancer research!

I support Fred Hutch because its scientists are world leaders in revolutionizing the way we prevent, detect, and treat cancer and related diseases.

 

I also chose Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center for personal reasons: 

  • Research at Fred Hutch leads to more humane treatments for cancer (like the immumotherapy trial I participate in). Having been through chemo (twice) and radiation (twice), as well as having been a caregiver for family/friends receving chemotheraphy, I can tell you first hand that --while still challenging-- immunotherapy is a significant improvement! 
  • Novel therapies (like immunotherapy) help cancer patients live longer lives. I am so truly fortunate to live in the Seattle area and have access to world-class research discoveries. I am not exaggerating to say that without clinical trials for new therapies (and the ideas and trials that combine therapies) I would not be enjoying the quality of life that I am today, living an active life with our three children, and celebrating another birthday.
  • Fred Hutch is largely funded by government research grants, which have been under attack in 2017. If funding stops, so do my current and future options for treating metastatic cancer. Cancer research is incredibly and personally important. 
  • Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) needs a lot of funding/research to improve outcomes. TNBC (the type of cancer I have, and 2 of my aunts survived) is rare (10-20% of breast cancers), difficult to treat (few options, and most require high toxicity, which leads to more side effects), is more likely to come back and spread, and has less positive prognosis and survival rates. Progress has been made, but more is possible! 


Join Me in Fueling Cures by Donating to The Hutch

Your gift will be directed to the Fred Hutch research lab of my Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) oncologist, Dr. V.K. Gadi. (http://www.sccablog.org/2012/11/meet-dr-v-k-gadi/)

Dr. Gadi and his team research breast cancer, including my cancer: Triple Negative Breast Cancer. Where other oncologists only offered options that would leave me bald and bedridden, "The Guru" steered me towards the least invasive and most promising clinical trials available. I owe him every productive year I add to my timeline.  


Please Support Cancer Research!

Dr. Gary Gilliland, president and director of Fred Hutch, has a bold vision. He believes Hutch scientists can find curative therapies for many, if not all, cancers by the year 2025. They just need the funding to do it.

Your gift will back innovative research that saves lives and make it possible for more people to move beyond cancer and live life to the fullest —meaning more birthdays and many more reasons to celebrate. 


Please donate today! And THANK YOU for helping to improve and save lives! 

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Did you know...

  • YOUR DONATION IS 100% TAX DEDUXTIBLE! 
  • The bone marrow transplant, developed by Dr. E. Donnall Thomas at Fred Hutch, earned him a Nobel Prize and provided the first example of the human immune system’s power to cure cancer. More than 1 million people have received this lifesaving procedure.
  • Today, Drs. Phil Greenberg (a soccer friend of Bruce's!) and Stanley Riddell continue Dr. Thomas’ legacy, leading the way in the game-changing field of immunotherapy. In fact, they are perfecting an approach that could render chemotherapy and radiation obsolete, making cancer treatment for patients much less grueling and toxic.
  • Dr. Denise Galloway helped develop the vaccine that prevents human papillomavirus, or HPV, infection, which can cause cervical cancer.
  • Dr. Jim Olson developed “Tumor Paint,” an experimental molecule derived from scorpion venom that illuminates cancer cells so surgeons can see tumor margins more clearly. This means surgeons can zero in on the cancer, eliminating all of it, without affecting healthy tissue.